Page content Page content Section navigation Topic navigation Accessibility keys Sitemap Search Contact us www.govt.nz portal
Go to Waikato Regional Council homepage
search icon mail icon contact us icon

  Environment » Environmental Information » Environmental indicators » Social and economic: monitoring and reporting » Population structure

Population structure

Why we monitor population structure

Knowing about the structure of our region's population helps us anticipate infrastructure needs around the region. For example, large numbers of children in an area will create a demand for schools and parks with adventure playgrounds. Areas with older residents may need parks with more sedentary activities available, or better public transport services.

Under-use of existing infrastructure in some areas and over-demand in others leads to environmental inefficiency.

What is happening?

Our region's general population is ageing, with a bulge of people in the 40 to 55 year age group. About half (53 percent) of the people living in our region are aged 35 years and older. In 2001 only  49 per cent of residents were over 35 years.

Our region's general population is ageing, with a bulge of people in the 40 to 55 year age group. About half (53 percent) of the people living in our region are aged 35 years and older. In 2001 only 49% of residents were over 35 years.

While there are more females than males overall (100 females per 95 males), there are more males than females under 25 years old (100 males to 97 females). The difference is largest in the over-85-years age group where there are only 58 males per 100 females.

In 1991, 18% of the Waikato region's population identified as belonging to the Maori ethnic group. This increased to 21% in 2013. Our region's Maori population is youthful - 44% of Maori are less than 20 years old, and 64% are less than 35 years old.

>>Find out more about these data and trends

What Waikato Regional Council is doing

  • Waikato Regional Council monitors population structure and assesses how this affects our environment.
  • We monitor the ecological footprint of Waikato’s population and encourage people to live more sustainably.
  • We work with the district and city councils in our region to ensure that infrastructure services have only a minimal effect on the environment.
  • We work with communities, district and city councils and other agencies to develop sustainable development strategies (Growth Strategies) that will build a prosperous economy based on a healthy environment and a healthy society. A good example of such a partnership is Waikato Regional Council involvement in the Taupo-nui-a-Tia 2020(external link) Project. This Project is a long-term vision for Lake Taupo integrating social, cultural, environmental and economic knowledge. This will enable agencies, iwi and the wider community to make educated and informed decisions about sustainable development in the Lake Taupo area.

More information

Useful links

Documents available from Waikato Regional Council

There are no relevant Waikato Regional Council Technical Reports currently available.

When this indicator is updated

This indicator is updated every five years.

Contact at Waikato Regional Council

Social Scientist - Science and Strategy Directorate

Footnotes

  1. Copyright: Information obtained from Statistics New Zealand may be freely used, reproduced, or quoted unless otherwise specified. In all cases Statistics New Zealand must be acknowledged as the source.
About this site     Contact us     Feedback and complaints New Zealand Government